Analytical study of Virtual Service Provider Office Management (VSPOM) Factors for Service Plan in the Regional Health Service in Thailand

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Phongpisanu Boonda

Abstract

This research aims to analyze VSPOM factors for service plan in the regional health service in Thailand. The research is descriptive, which uses structural relationship models. The samples used in the study were the following two groups: (1) 274 (90.13%) executives form 304 were selected purposively as conclusion criteria; and (2) 664 (81.07%) executives and practitioners from 819 were selected by multistage random sampling. The research tools were (1) executive questionnaire and (2) a Virtual Service Provider Office questionnaire, data were statistically analyzed by exploratory factor analysis (EFA) and second order confirmatory factor analysis (2nd Order CFA).


The research found that the variables model was composed of 10 factors from 74 selected variables as follows: (1) Resources, operational support, health services; (2) Developing academic subject; (3) General administration; (4) Culture of the organization; (5) Budget administration; (6) Organization philosophy; (7) Establishing and administrative in the health service virtualization; (8) Academic administration; (9) Personnel administration; and (10) Professional staff.


It can be concluded that 10 factors of variables model of the VSPOM for Service Plan in the Regional Health Service in Thailand had high construct validity by both exploratory and second order confirmatory factor analysis.

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How to Cite
Boonda, P. . (2018). Analytical study of Virtual Service Provider Office Management (VSPOM) Factors for Service Plan in the Regional Health Service in Thailand. MFU Connexion: Journal of Humanities and Social Sciences, 7(2), 148–173. Retrieved from https://so05.tci-thaijo.org/index.php/MFUconnexion/article/view/241204
Section
Research article

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