Implementation of Self-Directed Learning into English Courses at Mae Fah Luang University

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Thanapong Sombat
Wareesiri Singhasiri
Atipat Boonmoh

Abstract

The study aimed to investigate the implementation of self- directed learning (SDL) into English courses at Mae Fah Luang University (MFU). The study focused on how SDL was implemented in the English course syllabus at MFU and what students’ attitudes towards integration of SDL into course were. Data were collected from documents, course syllabi and course materials, and the participants; 2 course syllabus designers who designed Academic Reading and Writing (ARW) course and 153 students who undertook ARW course. The research was conducted by distributing questionnaire to 153 students, and then 15 out of 153 students were interviewed to gain more information about attitudes towards integration of self-directed into the course. The results revealed that there had been a development of implementation of SDL into the curriculum at MFU since it was established. The English Department responded to the policy of implementation of SDL from the executive administrator by integrating SDL into the courses by designing syllabi which incorporated self-study tasks. In addition, the students seemed to have positive attitudes towards integration of SDL into the course. They agreed to have SDL integrated into the course.

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How to Cite
Sombat, T., Singhasiri, W., & Boonmoh, A. (2014). Implementation of Self-Directed Learning into English Courses at Mae Fah Luang University. MFU Connexion: Journal of Humanities and Social Sciences, 3(1), 1–41. Retrieved from https://so05.tci-thaijo.org/index.php/MFUconnexion/article/view/241391
Section
Research article

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