The Effectiveness of Negotiation of Meaning Strategies on Developing Grammar Usage in Two-way Communication Tasks

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Wilawan Champakaew
Wanida Pencingkarn

Abstract

This article investigates the effectiveness of negotiation of meaning strategies on developing grammar usage of English language learners in two-way communication tasks. Thai freshmen students majoring English (n=30) participated in a 12-week of Listening and Speaking 1 course in 2011 academic year. The participants were placed into three groups with different English proficiency levels according to their English placement scores: high, mid and low proficiency groups. They were trained to use five types of negotiation of meaning strategies before taking part in three kinds of two-way communication tasks which consisted of problem-solving task, information-gap task and story- telling task. While performing the tasks, the participants’ conversations were audio-recorded and transcribed to analyze their negotiation of meaning strategies production as well as their grammar usage. The findings showed that negotiation of meaning strategies were facilitative in enhancing students’ grammatical development.  After using the negotiation of meaning strategies, the students’ grammar usage was improved in each type of tasks, especially in tenses.

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How to Cite
Champakaew, W., & Pencingkarn, W. (2014). The Effectiveness of Negotiation of Meaning Strategies on Developing Grammar Usage in Two-way Communication Tasks. MFU Connexion: Journal of Humanities and Social Sciences, 3(1), 87–114. Retrieved from https://so05.tci-thaijo.org/index.php/MFUconnexion/article/view/241398
Section
Research article

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