Phayom Dance: The Creativity of Southern Thai Folk Dance and the Provincial Flowers of Phatthalung in the Songkhla Lake Basin Area

Authors

  • Krittiya Choosong Faculty of Fine Arts SongKhla Rajabhat University
  • Aksrawadee Pattamasantiwong Faculty of Fine Arts SongKhla Rajabhat University

Keywords:

Phayom Dance, Creative, Southern Thai Folk Dance, Songkhla lake Basin

Abstract

                    Phayom Flower Dance is a performance of southern folklore, with Phatthalung flowers in the area of Songkhla Lake Basin. The purpose is to create works of southern folklore with the flowers of Phatthalung Province in the Songkhla Lake Basin area, and to promote tourism in Phatthalung Province by using qualitative research methods. The research instruments were surveys, interviews, and participant observation. The research results were that the process of creating a flower dance has five steps, as follows: 1) concept, 2) dance process design, 3) row variation, 4) costume design, 5) and music inspired by Phayom flowers. Phatthalung flowers have a cool white appearance as in the color of a dress. The dance process is divided into 2 phases. Phase 1 represents the nature of the trunk and the flowering is a bouquet of Phayom flowers. Phase 2 represents the important places of Phatthalung to promote tourism of the province. Using a dance style that is based on the Nora dance, the melody used is the southern folk band (the fifth instrument), bringing the ancient melodies in Nora and Nang Talung performances. It results in a new melody that is unique in Phatthalung Province.

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Author Biography

Krittiya Choosong, Faculty of Fine Arts SongKhla Rajabhat University

โปรแกรมวิชานาฏศิลป์และการแสดง  คณะศิลปกรรมศาสตร์  มหาวิทยาลัยราชภัฏสงขลา  อ.เมือง จ.สงขลา 90000

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Published

2021-06-20

How to Cite

Choosong ก., & Pattamasantiwong อ. . (2021). Phayom Dance: The Creativity of Southern Thai Folk Dance and the Provincial Flowers of Phatthalung in the Songkhla Lake Basin Area. Research and Development Journal Suan Sunandha Rajabhat University, 13(1), 41–55. Retrieved from https://so05.tci-thaijo.org/index.php/irdssru/article/view/247960

Issue

Section

Research Articles