Curriculum Development for Strengthening Necessary Competency in Noncommissioned Personnel Officers of the National Defense Studies Institute

  • Piyaphan Phanwiroj
  • Chomsupak Cruthaka
  • Wanwipa Chatuchai
  • Nounla-or Saengsook
Keywords: Competency, necessary performance, noncommissioned military officer, training course

Abstract

In this dissertation, the researcher examines (1) the essential competencies for non-commissioned officers at the National Defense Studies Institute (NDSI); constructs (2) an essential competencies enhancement program for the non-commissioned officers under study; and evaluates (3) the constructed program. The research was conducted in three steps as follows. Step One was the study of the essential competencies of non-commissioned officers. The sample population consisted of 196 non-commissioned officers at the National Defense Studies Institute (NDSI). The research instrument was a questionnaire concerning the essential competencies with the reliability of .987. Data were analyzed using mean and standard deviation. Step Two was the development of an essential competencies enhancement program for the non-commissioned officers under study. The program was constructed to be in consonance with the findings from the study of essential competencies. The components of the draft training program consisted of the conditions and necessity, objectives, and curriculum. The learning units consisted of the objectives of the learning units, behavioral objectives, contents, activities and training methods, training media, and measurement and evaluation. The draft training program developed was evaluated by five experts for appropriateness and consonance. The information obtained from the evaluation of the draft program was utilized in order to ensure that the draft program was more appropriate. Step Three was the evaluation of the essential competencies enhancement program in five aspects of the non-commissioned officers under study. The evaluation was conducted by the implementation of the program. 1. The comparison of the mean score of the knowledge of the non-commissioned officers under investigation after the training (= 8.47, SD = .54) was higher than prior to the training (= 7.51, SD = .75) at the statistically significant level of .01. This means that the non-commissioned officers under study who participated in the training exhibited an increase in all five aspects of essential competencies. 2. The comparison of the mean score of the non-commissioned officers under investigation after the training ( = 4.18, SD = .43) was higher than prior to the training (= 4.08, SD = .42) at the statistically significant level of .01. This means that the non-commissioned officers under study who participated in the training exhibited an increase in competencies. 3. The evaluation of participant satisfaction with the training program after the training in the aspects of contents of the training topics; speakers; activities and teaching methods; documents and training media; location and training period; and measurement and evaluation was found to be at a high to the highest level. 4. The comparison of the mean score of the knowledge of the non-commissioned officers under study at the end of the training ( = 8.47, SD = .54) and twelve weeks after the training (= 8.57, SD = .53) was found to be at a higher level than at the end of the training at the statistically significant level of .01. This shows that the training program exhibited retention. 5. The comparison of the mean score of the competencies of the non-commissioned officers under investigation at the end of the training (= 4.18, SD = .43) and twelve weeks after the training (= 4.26, SD = .40) was found to be at a higher level than at the end of the training at the statistically significant level of .01. This shows that the training program exhibited retention. Findings can be concluded as follows: 1. The non-commissioned officers under study exhibited essential competencies overall at a high level. When considered in each aspect, it was found that all aspects were at a high level in the following descending order: morality; teamwork; accountability; achievement motivation, and sacrifice. 2. The draft essential competencies enhancement training program for non-commissioned officers at NDSI consisted of the conditions of problems and necessities, objectives, curriculum, and five learning units. The experts examined the program and found that all components exhibited appropriateness at a high level. 3. The comparison of knowledge and essential competencies found that non-commissioned officers under study exhibited knowledge and competencies after the training at a higher level than prior to the training at the statistically significant level of .01. The retention remained twelve weeks after the training. Non-commissioned officers exhibited satisfaction with the implementation of the program overall at the highest level.

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Published
2020-12-27
How to Cite
Phanwiroj, P., Cruthaka, C., Chatuchai, W., & Saengsook, N.- or. (2020). Curriculum Development for Strengthening Necessary Competency in Noncommissioned Personnel Officers of the National Defense Studies Institute. Research and Development Journal Suan Sunandha Rajabhat University, 12(2), 68-87. Retrieved from https://so05.tci-thaijo.org/index.php/irdssru/article/view/248718
Section
Research Articles