The School Management Factors’ Model Affecting Students’ Success in Alternative Schools

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Thita Tantipiboonsup
Apitee Songbundit
Taweesil Koolnaphadol

Abstract

The objectives of the study were to 1) study the level of student success in alternative schools; 2) study causal structural relationships of the school management factors’ model affecting students’ success in alternative schools and; 3) analyze the correspondence of the developed causal structural relationships of the school management factors’ model with empirical data collected from 26 chosen alternative schools under OPEC with 26 managers selected through purposive sampling and 393 teachers through multi-stage random sampling. The research instrument for collecting empirical data was a survey with 90 questionnaire items. The reliability of the instrument ranged from 0.86 to 0.925. The descriptive statistics used include Pearson Correlation Coefficient. Structural equation modeling was used to analyze the simulated correspondence of the developed theoretical model with the empirical data. The results of the study were as follows. 1) The overall students’ success in alternative schools was at the highest level. 2) There are 5 factors with a direct impact on the students’ success, they are Leadership Practice, Teacher Pedagogy, Faculty and Staff Management, School Climate Management, and Community Management. In addition, there are 3 more factors with an indirect impact on the students’ success, they are Leadership Practice, Teacher Counselling, and Community Management. The 6 school management factors could represent up to 75 percent of students' success in alternative schools. 3) The analysis of causal structural relationships of the school management factors’ model affecting students’ success in alternative schools and the empirical data from the survey demonstrated that they were in concordance.

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How to Cite
Tantipiboonsup, T., Songbundit, A., & Koolnaphadol, T. (2022). The School Management Factors’ Model Affecting Students’ Success in Alternative Schools. Rajapark Journal, 16(44), 222–235. Retrieved from https://so05.tci-thaijo.org/index.php/RJPJ/article/view/255459
Section
Research Article

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